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the budget by 2023. >>> the california department of education is expanding its list of recommended reading for kindergarten through twelve grade and it includes newly published works dealing with sexual identity issues. here's abc7 news capital correspondent nannette miranda in sacramento with the story. >>> as summer nears, educators want to keep kids reading. the california department of education just updated its list of more than 7,800 recommended books. meant to prepare students for college and the ever-changing world. included for the first time are winners of the stone wall book award which recognizes lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgender literature. >> it's good to teach kids that everyone is different and we are all people and we can all be accepted for who we are. i think it's great to see those books being recommended. >> the books are recommended according to age. from young kids activity books celebrating gay rights leader harvey mills to books for older kids like i am jay, and totally joe, telling about a boy coming out. >> there's a full-scale war, a sexual war. >> social
getting educated is really critical. this generation has been lost, slip through the cracks, has not been educate along the way. i think an organization like the national endowment for financial education is a great resource to start from. i don't believe that wall street is always the best place to get educated. so there's a start, a place to start a plan. melissa: yeah. >> next thing have someone hold you accountable. meet with somebody. i like pat's idea, find a financial buddy. we often work out with a buddy to help us out. find a financial advisor and somebody you can work with. melissa: that makes sense. you say saving 15 to 20% of your annual income. i wonder at what price? saving aside 20% of the your income, does that mean you don't buy a house, you rent instead? would you set aside the income and use credit cards and rack up debt so you can save? at what price, how serious is it to save that much money. >> how serious is that individual, that's the question. because let's put this in reference. this individual that in our scenario, sob who is 50 to 60 years old or so, they're re
with our financial ostentations to educate consumers about the new value proposition that this will bring. though idea is to make shopping easier. fully convergent, both for remote transactions and processing transactions. tracy: what does this mean in the terms that we may buy a loaf of bread at the grocery store. >> our vision is that with your phone you will be doing a tap and pay at a physical location and when you will want to make a payment over your phone you well not have to enter your 16 digit number but you simply have to enter a log and password. tracy: what about security? that is a number one concern for consumers. the mastercard brand, do you think, give you an advantage or a level of assurance that some of these other companies cannot provide. >> very much so. as a consumer you have all the benefits the you enjoy today. and we're going to introduce a security features in this digital devices. tracy: and the last thing, some of your competitors, visa and discover have recently said they will not charge any sort of fee on digital wallets, companies like paypall and even ebay
to see better educated, but you understand that an effective member has to negotiate and has to compromise to come to some sort of final product. otherwise you will never get a final product. >> i agree with -- what is the biggest problem we face today that we are just stop gone? it is this fiscal crisis, the budget. families are looking at it and saying i have got to deal with this all the time, and you guys cannot deal with it. the biggest thing to me would be the leadership of congress to recognize that the budget aocess has to be utilized in way that gets this issue resolved, because if we go every three months with more in decision and 11th-hour -- making, thetizen frustration that people have to live their lives and cannot figure out the process, it will drive them nuts and treat the most negative phillies in the world. it is the responsibility of leadership to make this process work, and they have to act like leaders, like tom daschle did and some of the other folks. >> changing the rules might take the incentive structure, but ultimately is about the men and women who
a sweep stakes model. smit: a big part is education; right? education of using the card in an appropriate fashion. why is that also a key -- a key promise of what you are doing? >> well, we're at an innovation conference, so many innovations and payments in the marketplace. what's challenging is getting consumers to understand the features and benefits getting them to adopt them. that's what pay perks is here for, educate consumers about what products and features are available for them and get them to use them in ways that benefit, again, the valuechain. shibani: dozens of companies here, but few run by a female. talk to me about being a woman in this environment, in this lean in time that cheryl sandberg talked about, and, you know, just overall what your views are. >> it's not something i think about a lot. with sherylout now, it is interesting to think about. i think that there's no difference between male and female ceos, and i think it's nice to get attention from a female ceo, but i would rather be recognized as a ceo. shibani: it was on this day in business back in 1894 that the v
very passionatably as someone that grew up in new york city and bronx. my mom was an educator, worked in parts and administration for the district of education. the vanishing middle class in new york city, it is really a staggering thing to hold. having watched the trajectory of this city, the rising inequality, the losses of middle class jobs and low paying service jobs and then the -- massive increase in the cost of housing. i want to talk about how to stop new york from becoming essentially 1%, 99% city right after this. way the bristles moe to the way they clean, once you try an oral-b deep sweep power brush, you'll never want to go back. its dynamic power bristles reach between teeth to remove up to 76% more plaque than sonic in hard to reach areas. oral-b deep sweep 5000 power brush. >> announcer: did you know there are secret black market websites around the world that sell stolen identities? >> 30-year-old american man, excellent credit rating. >> announcer: lifelock monitors thousands of these sites 24 hours a day. and if we discover any of our members' data for sale, lifeloc
while still spending $13 million on education aid in pakistan. that is where the hatred against the u.s. is at record levels. that is just a fraction of the $370 million we spend on all fouraid. and to egypt, i and the country not happy with us. this administration is missing a golden opportunity with this sequester. instead of acting like a two-year-old throwing a temper tantrum, instead of laying people off and closing the white house, why not really look at where the money is going, look at the smart ways we can meet spending requirements. we just ask for the ones you spend your money wisely. because it is our money, now we want to know what you think. should we send money to pakistan while cutting military aid to american soldiers? log onto gerriwillis.com and i will share the results at the end of tonight's show. we will be asking are we facing a new housing bubble? and blaming congress for troubles, is it fair? and what is next for the housing behemoth? and with that: you're history. instead of looking behind... delta is looking beyond. 80 thousand of us investing billions... in
assistance with basic services including education for syrian children so far from on, whose lives have been up in did. ended.n up- as parents, we can only imagine how heartbreaking that must be for any parent, to see their children having to go through those kinds of tumult they are experiencing. as our partnership improves, the lives of not only the jordanian people, but people across the region. your majesty, i want to express my great appreciation for our partnership. i want to thank you and the jordanian people for the hospitality you have shown me, and for my fellow americans. this is my last visit. -- i am looking forward to tomorrow, weather permitting, seeing one of the greats waters of history, that the world can experience thanks to jordan and its people. thank you. >> yes? >> thank you, your majesty. mr. president. i want to ask you -- how are you going to keep the borders open for the syrian regime? -- refugees? anything could happen at any time. is it the electricity or the water? you might find 1000 refugees. that is what you spoke about, your majesty. i want to thank you agai
california company startups and the like. the underlining foundation of infrastructure, education, the existing businesses that are in california. all of that provides a solid foundation for economic growth and for businesses to stay in california. some leave, but actually over the last decade and a half, it has been very small percentages of the total employment in california, actually less than 1% of the total employment has left. there has been a decline, but that is from the general collapse of the economy causing a crisis in the economy. the real key to success is education, research, infrastructure, manufacturing of all kinds of things and change. cheryl: i am glad you're bringing up the answers because that is what i wanted to hear from you, what can i do to keep companies like apple and facebook. these are companies that are still headquartered in california but expanding in the state of texas. one thing we look at was the cost of doing business, to look at the national average, texas is well below the national average when it comes to doing business, cost o the cost of bu
to save you money. my job is not just to entertain you, but i'm trying to teach and educate you so call me, 1-800-743-cnbc. look, maybe it just needs to go lower. that's way thought all day as the market see-sawed. the dow closing down 90 points, s&p back sliding 8.3%. nasdaq falling 0.97%. to me the stock market is represented by the averages. the sum of the evidence that's out there right now about where things are headed in the future. in the last 24 hours, the weight of the evidence has shifted to the negative. unless we get some big breaks here, these negatives will begin to be reflected in the averages beyond where they went out today. you know i've said repeat lid i'm willing to take a pass of the last percent or two of the rally because i don't want to be greedy. bulls make money, bears make money and hogs are slaughtered. i thought it would take out the high inspiring too much short-term euphoria. that hasn't happened, which in itself i find worrisome. i didn't like so many of the loudest bears out there like adam parker, nice guy, morgan stanley, just turned bullish. it did bothe
at the department of education national assessment program test. they say that only 38% of the 12th graders in the united states are grade level proficient in reading. we had a country where kids are not getting through grammar school and high school reading correctly. i think we need to focus on this country and repairing our basic educational system. when the government is putting out almost $600 billion in money that people can turn around and give to colleges, that increases the price of college. charles: startling numbers and the in game could be even more startling. thank you very much. it is time for me to try to make you some money. this dog is actually down a little bit. i like that. one of the rivals was acquired by them. 744 learning centers. fifty-seven schools. revenues were up last year. guidance has been fairly strong. this one, i think is real solid. the nation with the most english speakers in the world will be china. i am looking for $20 or more on this stock. right now, i have to job descriptions for you. governor of the state. second one, superintended of a school distri
. education and energy, about 73,000 federal employees. >> i think that his budget is reckless and irresponsible. it has no chance of passage. >> i think it is a very good plan. >> i would like to add six federal agencies. >> we have commerce -- books -- energy, hard. [laughter] >> he is just doing a rick perry impression for us to bring back a moment of nostalgia. the a-team is going to be right back with us. more with the a-team leader later in the broadcast. up next, governor cuomo running a helping hand to hollywood. the governor is learning why you don't mess with gun control. not even in new york state. that is coming up next. and liberal activists preventing thank you orville and wilbur... ...amelia... neil and buzz: for teaching us that you can't create the future... by clinging to the past. and with that: you're history. instead of looking behind... delta is looking beyond. 80 thousand of us investing billions... in everything from the best experiences belo.. to the finest comforts above. we're not simply saluting history... we're making it. lou: new york's governor is
a hoveround can take you! >>> believe it or not, you want to educate yourself about business you can learn a heck of a lot from monopoly, the fabulous board game that i used to win at almost all of the time as a kid mostly because my family didn't want to deal with me being a sore loser. confidentially, i did like to turn the board over and stomp out of the room in tears if i lost! >> wow! >> so i don't blame them for letting me win. you remember how monopoly works, right? when someone lands on the space they owe you 25 smackers monopoly money, but -- oh, it's chinese money. it's probably worth a fortune, but if you own all four railroads and if you have a monopoly on the rail business in this imaginary world, and another player lands on them, then you have to pay the guy $200. that's a fortune, right? that's a fortune. what the heck does this have to do with the real world or the real stock market? simple. it teaches us that as companies have more market share and less competition they can make their customers pay them a heck of a lot more money like the railroads. a monopoly is a wonderf
yeo economic levels within all religions and every level of education. according to the government. the united states has the worst record in industrialized nation losing five children every day to abuse death. joining me in the studio from the san francisco child abuse prevention center is katie allbright. >> thank you so much for having me around for shining the spotlight on this important issue. >>er love what the prevention does. you are celebrating an anniversary today? >> yes, we have been working in san francisco for 40 years preventing child abuse. we are very excited about our future and vision. we're here to stay and looking forward to the next 40 years. >> cheryl: this was started by a man with immense compassion for the issue? >> he was a pediatrician at general hospital and saw incidents of violence in the hospital, how in the community can come together to protect children. that inspired a man and we were able to do it for 40 years here in san francisco. >> cheryl: you have a number of
vacation. meanwhile, the u.s. gets a c-minus from education week for the school system as schools across the country continue to struggle with failing students facing record deficits. new jersey governor chris christie called school supers arrogant and greedy, but when new jersey tried to cap super pay, the school school superintendents sided the cap by double dipping, retiring early to pocket the pensions, and then they got rehired elsewhere as school administrators or consultants. in new jersey, one retired 18 years ago, but got rehired 23 times since as a school administrator elsewhere pocketing $1.2 million, and double dips is rampant in ohio too. back to you. gerri: great story. thanks, liz. on to farmers. they are getting paydays for the land. it's part of what some call another golden age for farming. with more on this, host of u.s. farm report. john, thanks for being with us. great to have you on the show, now, this story surprised me because i thought the drought killed you all, and hear that farmland is on fire, and, in fact, some investment banks out there try to snap up as af
by and understand they have an attack when it is too late. they have to have policies in place. they have to educate their workplace. connell: great stuff. we want to point out in the next hour here on fox business that cheryl casone will wrap up what has been a weeklong series on taxes. they have an expert panel coming on answering your questions. they will be doing a lot of this on twitter. you can tweet in right now. just use the hash tag tax pain. dagen: you are tweeting a lot during the game yesterday. i was kind of excited to see you tweeting actively. meantime, here to talk, wayne rogers. he is worried about more cities and towns going bankrupt. why are people buying invisible bonds hand over fist? connell: always good to talk to wayne. jeff flock. we will see if there is still time for you to get in on that. before we get to all of that, let's take a look at treasury yields. ♪ [ male announcer ] this is joe woods' first day of work. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'lwork his way up from busser to waiter to chef
need a college education? are all kids suited to college? john stossel, host of "stossel" here on the fox business network and he's with us this morning. john, i'm going to start out with some opinion. it's an article of faith in america everybody should go to college because that's the way you get the best jobs. i disagree, i don't think everybody should go and don't think that everybody gets the best jobs if they go to college. >> a rare occasion we agree. it's an article of faith and it's wrong for kids, many too many kids go, they're deep in debt. 70% of bar tenders have degrees now. a lot of these jobs don't need college. stuart: 70%? where did you get that from? >> i don't know, we dig up the statistics. 15% of taxi drivers, 17% of baggage porters. and it's become this thing you say, the average college graduate, and this is true, makes a million dollars over a lifetime. stuart: more than a nongraduate. >> right, and the politicians cite this statistics, it's true, but totally misleading because the kind of kids who go to college in the first place were already more organ
, education and voting and that, in fact, the more, the higher socioeconomic classes, the more education, the less likelihood one is to vote for islamists. and, in fact, we could even -- and some of the data shows this -- that less education, um, lower wealth one is more likely to vote for not justice lammists, but the salafi groups and so on. so i i think that's a very, very important -- and i think that's in line with the findings and the arguments that are made here. i also think that the other general trend without overemphasizing it is also valid, and that is that we are likely to see decreasing electoral strength for islamists generally. and there are many reasons for that. some quite simple, that is that, you know, up until 2011, up until the egyptian uprising islamist groups, in particular the muslim brother hood, are really the only serious political actors other than mubarak's ruling party that actually took elections seriously. and there was good reason for that. if you were a rational voter in egypt under mubarak, you stayed home because you knew that your vote didn't mean an
. spin off news corp education business and time warner publishing. a lot of companies have significant amount of cash, very solid balance sheet, returning capital to shareholders. international expansion is another theme. all told investors are really, very, very happy with the performance of these stocks over last several years consistently beating most of the major benchmarks. sandra: a stock we all watch often is netflix which i'm looking at which suffered a down day today. it is $181 a share. i wonder how they could possibly benefit from the move away from pay-tv services? >> netflix entered the fray to revolutionize the model, the traditional television model. taking people away from appointment viewing and trying to provide you content when you want it and how you want it. i think internet television is here to stay. it is pretty early to say that they're going to, you know, overtake traditional television anytime, soon. we think it is very complimentary. you've seen netflix and guys like disney and dreamworks animation strike what we consider to be potential ground breaking cont
international. helping survivors of war and conflict. finance international providing financial education to children around the world. >> that's great. >> right out of the gates, we've got the nasdaq composite down by a little bit more than 1%. feeling the brunt of the losses early on in trading. >> isn't that funny? >> google was, frankly, was there a note last week that they didn't talk about, that google may have trouble making -- look, i'm just pointing out that there is an old -- new tech came under pressure last week at the same time that the western digitals and the sandesk. >> i can say something about google for a second? >> no. i'm sorry. 2 got zero play and nobody cared. i'm the only one that scared now it's ebay. >> and it came out with a big report that basically said in their testing, paid search which is 90% of google's revenue. >> yes. >> made no impact on click through rates or results. that basically free, just being out there with your meditags and everything else was just as good as paid search. it had all of these algorithms and i didn't understand half of it, but i
they're at odds over wages and benefits. musicians will hand out flyers to educate the public about the impact of the strike. >>> and a 62-year-old attorney and surfer in santa cruz county is being accused of harassing paddle borders. that suspect is out on bail after getting arrested on vandalism charges. he's suspected of scratching a truck parked near 38th avenue near east cliff drive. investigators believe he may have vandalized other vehicles. he's anowed that they're using a popular surfing spot. territorial, i guess. >> none of the surfers i know would do that. >> no. >>> let's check in with sal. you're watching 880 and everything else. >> yes, it's become a lot heavier in the last few minutes. that's a traffic that's usually busy at this hour. it's kind of strange for most of the morning it's light and then this hour it starts to get busy as it gets crowded. when you get to the toll plaza, it looks pretty good. it's improved. just as we suspected it night. there are no problems in san jose. i would avoid 280. use 880 to 101. they're still investigating a fatal crash and tryi
to fund the job that makes them move to the better neighborhood, better education for the child, and it's harder for lower income americans to get the first job, gain skills and experience they need to climb the income ladder later in life. >> what's interesting, you know, the top 10% pays 70% of the income at the federal level. 1986 #, curtis, that was 55% of income. that income, that federal income into the coffers which congress continues to spend at will, frankly, has gone up for the top 10%. that includes small businesses. thank you very much for joining me on this issue. it affects a lot of people. >> thank you for having me. >> coming up tomorrow, we are going to continue our series. you are not going to want to miss friday's show, in particular, though, when i go one on one with gofer norquist the president of americans for tax reform. you know grover thinks, and he'll join me friday and the series, of course, continues all week long. grounding the american airlines, u.s. airways merger. a senate committee wrapping hearings on whether the airline tieup violates antitrust laws. m
know, in france and in europe, the level of education for people is very high. so we have a very, very strong, you know, population to work. we have very strong infrastructure. so it's also a big place to invest. >> are you a supporter of holland and some of the things he's done? >> well, you know, they've done a few things. i would love to have more to be done, to be done because i think, again, france needs to be more attractive. >> are you rooming with -- >> i thought he was in russia now. >> even though he's an honorary citizen. >> we have a lot of business in europe, in russia, actually, and we are citizens of the world. >> that's a good answer. >> that's a good answer. >> very slippery. >> you spent a lot of time on diversity in women. >> yeah. >> and women in the workplace, given cheryl samberg's new book is a real issue. >> yeah. >> have you read the book? >> no, i've not read the book, but i've heard about the book, yep. >> the reason i ask -- >> what were you going to say? >> i have another question when you're done. >> the reason i was going to ask was whether you agree with
public accountants. i said, listen, you're an educated guy. you must have had a lot of wealthy clients and business people. here's what he said. >> all the assurances they get from european officials was that their deposits are not at risk. there may be other need for additional taxes for significant government cuts. the loans actually supports their banking system. but there was never discussion of any cut on depolisitsdeposit >> in other words, they were expecting traditional types of austerity. when we have more news we'll get it to you. >> let's cross over to moscow with steve sedgwick. we used to be colleagues in london for a long time. i know you've done a lot of reporting in moscow. isn't it the case that the russians will string the cypriots along here? they will get much more if they need to when the banking system collapses if that's where we're headed. surely. >> yeah, simon, you make a very good point. there's a lot of people thinking, what's the gain? they've already let the money back in 2011, they led with 2.5 billion euros. so extending that and the term on that, reduci
decision. he might bring up one, he might put in school safety issues because the education committee has actually done something on that. mental illness. but it's the beginning, chris. >> chris, he owes the people of america a vote. >> a vote. >> whether or not we pass something he owes the people of america a vote. he's certainly the families of victims he owes them a vote. and i belief the percolation we need to see so we finally get does sensible. >> in fact, he may be rolling the dice much less on this than in previous -- when he brought up the sandy he knew he would lose it when he brought up the fiscal cliff deal he knew he was going to lose that too. he may bring it up for a vote and, you know, there's not enough votes to sustain it in which he can look like a hero to everyone. thank you all for joining us this morning. >> thank you. >> obama news really after this. . but don't worry, he'll find someone else. ♪ who's that lady? ♪ who's that lady? ♪ sexy lady ♪ who's that lady? [ female announcer ] swiffer sweeper's electrostatic dry cloths attract and lock dirt, dust, and
dramatic declines in the reasons for saving for education, dramatic decline in buying a house, a dramatic decline in a retirement. what went up, liquidity, people wanted to be liquid, you know, and i think some of that was just fear for our or patly fear, and saving for a purchase. that had a dramatic one. i'll save money for two or three weeks if i try to get the boots that i really want, but they are not saving long term, and, to me, that means we live in the moment. >> worst to do is leave your children after you passed with high debt. you don't want to do that. >> well, no, it's worse than that. you run out of money, too, for your actual living expenses. we used to live in a society where we with more pension, where you could count on social security where you were dying at an earlier age. we live long. you mentioned that. where you had a pension at work and the value of the house went up. our parent's generation, you bought a house, paid it off, and when they retired, sold it, realized the equity, bought something cheaper, and lived off that money. now almost all those things are gon
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)